The world and beyond – Surviving in the economic jungle

Advice, tips and tricks on how to engage with the UK jobs market and commercial environment, from a female executive's perspective

Posts Tagged ‘marekting recruitment

Introducing “The definitive guide to job seeking”

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With high unemployment statistics and a shift from traditional sources to an increasingly sophisticated online jobs market, it is no surprise that there is growing frustration amongst job seekers about how to engage with the challenge of finding a new job.

Organisations that use the Internet to advertise their available jobs provide continual training and information for their staff about how to engage with this medium. Unfortunately, the job seeker, who only dips in and out of this resource periodically (And usually with urgency) has been left behind. Other than the help functions on each website, there are very few sources of information designed to guide them through the quagmire of the modern job search.

Other than divorce or losing a loved one, being without a job is one of the most stressful periods in an individual’s life. Redundancy has been prevalent in the past years. This invariably leaves job seekers with feelings of rejection, inadequacy and hopelessness. Unfortunately, the job market has become commoditised and people often feel that they are being treated as numbers, protracting the feelings of uselessness. This drains confidence. And getting to an interview with confidence, after all, is the prime goal if you want to find a new job!

I often speak to candidates who have been out of work and continually job seeking, even for months, with no success. They are despondent and emotionally exhausted by the current jobs market that operates negatively, and doesn’t support people. Human beings need and deserve positive input about their abilities and skills; however the system is selective and competitive. It is also impersonal with no sensitivity to the human impact of its actions. And that is exactly the issue: It is a depersonalised commercial system, populated by personalised human beings with hopes, feelings and emotions. This is why severe frustrations invariably develop.

In this series, I hope to discuss the key areas prevalent in today’s jobs market to offer at least a positive starting base for the job seeker. I believe that, by informing and imparting information, some of the frustration will hopefully be removed from the process of finding a new job, leading to a deeper understanding and preserving self-confidence for when that all-important job interview does eventually occur.

I will look at the following areas:

1.  Setting your objectives: Making sure you set out on an appropriate course from the start

2. Commoditise yourself: Taking the emotion out of the process and finding your USP’s

3.  The recruitment process: Understanding where you fit into the scheme of things

4.  Writing a CV to fit the purpose: How to turn your CV into a sales document aimed at an online audience.

5. Managing the online monster: How to get your CV in the most important places, and to get it found

6. Engaging with recruitment agencies: What to expect, how to get the best results and how to build relationships

I will be very happy to include any other areas of interest, so please respond to the blog or send me an e-mail with your questions and I will do my best to comply.

I will publish the series in weekly editions starting on the 23rd February, building up to a final document that will be available via my website .

Happy Christmas

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I would like to wish everyone a wonderful Christmas and a truly happy and prosperous New Year.

There are going to be a few changes at CRA in the 2011 – Watch this space for more information!

For now, this is my Christmas wish to everyone: http://bit.ly/grJQtg

New Marketing jobs in the Automotive Aftermarket

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It is a rare opportunity for a marketing job opportunity like this to come along, and then 2 pop up at the same time!

Our client is one of the largest distributors of replacement parts to the automotive aftermarket in the UK. From their base in the Midlands, they support a national distribution network to supply spares into a wide range of customers.

Benefitting from the changes in the vehicle market with less new cars sold and more services and repairs taking place, the aftermarket has been buoyant and this organisation has experienced growth and development in the past year.

As part of this growth and product diversification strategy, they now require product marketing specialists to join their 20-strong marketing team in the following positions:

Category Manager

Product Manager

The skills required are common to distribution based or FMCG products and candidates with a traditional marketing background are welcome to apply, although of course candidates with previous experience of the automotive industry are particularly desirable. Salaries range between £30k and £40k, together with a sound benefits package that includes a company car.

There is a separate role description available for each position so please send your CV to recruitment@cathyrich.co.uk or call Cathy on 0845 269 9085 for more information.

#HireFriday – Will this work in the UK jobs market?

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I received this e-mail from Margo Rose, who launched #HireFriday on Twitter in the USA last week:

“#HireFriday is my brain child, fueled by my passion for Compassionate HR  As you know, the recruiting industry in the US is very client centric, which often leaves most candidates eating dust.  Because of great people like Bill Boorman, Mervynn Dinnen, and Alan Whitford, I understand the wishes, desires, and needs in the UK are equally weighted.  This delights me.  It is in this spirit that I launched #HireFriday last Friday.

I’m sick of #followfriday, with its meaningless stacks of names.  Isn’t it better to help your friends, and loved ones find jobs, make connections and network with really reputable recruiters and hiring managers?

What #HireFriday is NOT is a place where recruiters post spammy jobs.  It’s a place where we tweet the names of candidates/their occupation/job title/unique skills/city location they choose to work.  It’s for the candidate.  It is then my hope that recruiters, hiring managers and non-hr people will tap that person on the shoulder and say, hey this Company is hiring, and I think you’d be perfect for the job…

It’s like a bulletin board for candidates, pure and simple.  Then, it is my hope that someone will see a person in the twitter stream that works in their respective industry and help the jobseeker get connected with a helpful resource or person.

 This is my passion, it’s in my heart.  I’m not trying to monetize this.  I do not choose to make “commissions.”  I simply want to be helpful.  I registered the hashtag, and I work in a Law Firm, so we’ll have legal eagle eyes to keep creepy, spammy people out (as much as possible).”

I aim to role this out as a trial on Twitter in the UK as from next week. With the jobs boards clogging up and everyone competing for the same jobs and candidates, this might free up the market. And literally, it will be FREE for everyone.

More news will follow soon – I will be happy to receive comments and views please!

Slaying Goliath

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This last week was a very interesting one to me – I am beginning to realise more and more that the slightly right wing views I have of the recruitment industry are actually not that far off pitch.

A few weeks ago, a new client responded to some marketing information I sent out. They are a smallish Tier 1 supplier to the automotive industry, looking to recruit a new Sales Director for a rather niche and complex product.

Now usually, I prefer not to get too involved in the bun fight that is contingency recruitment. I work on my own and I simply don’t have the resources (I believe) to compete with the large contingency recruitment businesses. And I’ve been around long enough to know that a lot of effort can go into very little return, that I can’t afford to be thruthful. Everything I do has to show ROI if I want my business to be successful.

Anyway, I agreed to accept the vacancy and they agreed, without quibble, to my standard contingency fee. 

I don’t have a very large candidate database. My candidate access is made up of a network of contacts and WOM referrals, people I have worked with for a long time and senior managers looking for a potential move but not terribly active in the market. So in a fit of lapsed confidence, I approached a previous employer (Big brand tehcnical recruitment company) to see if they would care to share.

Well of course they would! But unfortunately, they were already working on this role and had been for some weeks. As it appears, have the rest of the tehcnical recruitment world. Talk about saturation!

So, having already accepted the vacancy, I decided to do my best and then move on to the next job. I submitted 5 candidates, all of whom I fel confident were good and appropriate, but I know that the larger agencies were going all out at sourcing loads of candidates.

In total, the client received over 100 CV’s. I did ask the question whether it really was the best use of a CEO’s time to screen through so many, but they were already committed to the process. I honestly didn’t think I would stand a chance, with so many candidates in the mix!

Out of the 100 + CV’s, the client decided to interview 15 people. Out of my 5 submissions, I got 4 interviews.

Out of the 15 interviews, he called 3 candidates for second. 2 of those were mine!

Unfortunately, one of my candidates got offered a directorship elsewhere and had to withdraw. Lo and behold: The standby candidate was mine too!

SO out of my 5 submissions, 4 got to interview and 3 were shortlisted. Overall, I thought this was a very positive outcome.

I nearly fell off my chair when the client called to say that the third candidate had pulled out. The only 2 people left in the final interview stage, where both my candidates!

I am absolutely delighted. I know luck plays a part in recruitment. And that the numbers game sometimes pays off for recruiters who spray as much as they can in the hope that something will stick. But for me, this truly signifies the role of the independent recruiter: A slick, targeted, direct service delivered with intelligence and quality rather than quantity and desperation.

The final interviews take place next week and I know full well that a lot can still go wrong. But, as a small SME working in a very competitive market and aiming to do something really different in recruitment, I feel that I have truly achieved a coup. And I have a client for life, whether this role goes to offer or not.

David slayed Goliath regardless (or maybe because of) their difference in size. I think I might be doing the same!

3 Super Marketing jobs: Automotive Aftermarket Distribution

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It is a rare opportunity for a marketing job opportunity like this to come along, and then 3 pop up at the same time!

Our client is one of the largest distributors of replacement parts to the automotive aftermarket in the UK. From their base in the Midlands, they support a national distribution network to supply spares into a wide range of customers.

Benefitting from the changes in the vehicle market with less new cars sold and more services and repairs taking place, the aftermarket has been buoyant and this organisation has experienced growth and development in the past year.

As part of this growth and product diversification strategy, they now require product marketing specialists to join their 20-strong marketing team in the following positions:

Category Manager

Product Manager

Data Analysis Manager

The skills required are common to distribution based or FMCG products and candidates with a traditional marketing background are welcome to apply, although of course candidates with previous expereicne of the automotive industry are particularly desirable. Salaries range between £30k and £40k, together with a sound benefits package that includes a company car.

There is a separate role description available for each position so please send your CV to recruitment@cathyrich.co.uk or call Cathy on 0845 269 9085 for more information.

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