The world and beyond – Surviving in the economic jungle

Advice, tips and tricks on how to engage with the UK jobs market and commercial environment, from a female executive's perspective

Definitive Guide to Job Hunting 16: What to do at Interviews

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A job interview can be an especially stressful and even overwhelming experience.

I was delighted to find that, in my recent issue of Toastmasters magazine, they dedicate several pages on tips for job interviews, with some really useful advice and information on how to create the best personal impression. I liked it so much, I decided to include it in my blog so the next few weeks will be dedicated to Toastmasters, and will cover the “speaking” part of your job interview.

So, how do you feel about preparing for an interview? Are you excited, or maybe nervous … Not sure what to expect …. Maybe you feel like everything is riding on the interview – the job, your career your life.

But they don’t have to be stressful and daunting – In fact you can even enjoy having a good interview! Focus all your energy and take the recommendations from others to give your best possible performance and to present yourself as the candidate of choice.

Start off strong

Arrive at the location early – 10 to 15 minutes before the appointed time. That way, you can put the final polish on your appearance and be calm when you walk through the door. Greet everyone you encounter with a smile and firm handshake.

Don’t assume anything

People often assume that the interviewer remembers what is in the CV and cover letter. Don’t fall into this trap. Ideally, the interviewer would have had time to focus on your application before the interview, but all too often people are busy and this doesn’t always happen.

For example, they might have interviewed several people that day for the same job. Maybe they received your CV from the HR department just before meeting you. Or perhaps they read your CV the week before, and haven’t had time to revisit it since. If you assume they already know what you have to offer, you will miss opportunities to present yourself as the strongest candidate possible.

When you greet the interviewer, offer an additional copy of your CV. They will most likely have a copy and decline, so don’t insist but taking an extra copy proves that you are prepared.

It’s not only about your PAID experience

When discussing your skills, experience and accomplishments, don’t hesitate to use relevant anecdotes from other facets of your life. For example, for graduate roles, classroom activities such as group projects can provide good examples to employers of how you can contribute.

What the interviewer is listening out for is that you really care about what you did, what the situation was and how you handled it. Someone who has experienced a challenging situation and responded to it in a creative, dynamic way is a desirable person in any team.

Next time: How to answer questions

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